When Fabrice Muamba collapsed on the pitch during Saturday’s FA Cup quarter-final, many people audibly gasped.

If this scene makes you want to Tweet racist rubbish, you don't deserve a computer. Pic: AP

Some spoke words of concern, while others simply held their breath.

Liam Stacey - a 21-year-old Welsh biology student - saw it as the perfect opportunity to alienate the entire world by openly mocking the unconscious player and posting a string of racist and sexist comments in response to criticism from other Twitter users. Obviously, the lad isn’t the first to haphazardly press a bunch of keyboard keys in a decidedly racist order. But being the most most recent to do so probably makes him more idiotic, in many ways.

By now, people should have figured out this whole “not destroying your career and poisoning your name via Twitter” thing. The rules, you see, are fairly simple.

Some, like “don’t defend Chris Brown”, are obvious. Others - such as “seriously, don’t defend Chris Brown” – shouldn’t even need to be spoken aloud at this point.

It’s really not that difficult. But if you, like Mr Stacey, are at all confused about these simple rules, pick up a crayon and jot this next one down: Don’t joke about natural disasters or severely injured sports stars in the immediate aftermath of said disaster or injury.

“But,” you’ll say as your eyes shoot laser-like defiance at your anonymous critics, “Ricky Gervais and Louis CK say obscene things and get away with it - why should I be any different?”. But you are not “edgy”, or “brave” or “wickedly controversial” or any other adjectives that may appear within the DVD blurb of a Louis CK performance.

You, person who types inappropriate things at inappropriate times, are a random yahoo on Twitter cracking funnies about mass graves and universal heartache. You probably think it’s a biting bit of “satire”. In reality, the sentence you have just uttered sits somewhere above the sound of a potato falling off a table and slightly below the squelch of an idiot plunging their finger into a birthday cake.

At this point, you’re probably feeling the urge to rant about “the context” of the remark - which is, of course, that hundreds of innocent people died horribly violent deaths, providing you with the inspiration needed to craft your mercilessly-insensitive school-level pun. You may genuinely believe that when you said: “Kony is da dude and clubbing baby seals is cool” - you were actually commenting on the nature of US involvement in African conflicts and something else that was really smart about sustainability and baby seals.

Others, however, might be difficult to convince.

And this next bit is especially important. If you should ever tweet something off-colour, don’t – as Liam Stacey did - say your account was hacked. Just don’t do it. Even if you have grainy video footage of your tabby furiously pistol-whipping you into submission, handcuffing you to a chair and using your laptop to type and post a 5,000-word essay titled: “Why racism is better than sunny days, rainbow ice-cream and tiny puppies” – don’t say your account was hacked.

Unless you’ve spent the past five days leading up to your racially-charged joke tweeting: “Random people in trench coats on the street still can’t believe my password is ‘password’ LOL” - no one’s going to believe you. The Illuminati did not take time out of their ancient secret-keeping and Da Vinci-coding to take control of your Tumblr account and write an all-caps racist tirade in bright-red comic sans in an effort to discredit you among your 13 followers.

Speech may be free, but that doesn’t mean you have to use it all the time. Sometimes, when a man falls on the pitch, it’s better to hold your breath.

Most commented

68 comments

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    • SteveKAG says:

      05:05am | 22/03/12

      I think most people who do this are just after a reaction. Even many people on the Punch will say things just to get a rise.  There are many of us who are passionate left or right wing or moral defenders or pure capitalists, those who believe in man made climate change, those who don’t.  Those of us in that ilk defend our belief’s passionalty and so we should but there are a few who are just on her for their 15 minutes of fake name fame.  This Liam character probably fits in the bucket.

    • Nathan says:

      06:27am | 22/03/12

      the thing that amuses me about it is that i never heard what he said, he was a nobody so why would i.  so lets give what he said media attention as if it helps the cause at all.  I can decide for myself if i am offended or not.

    • VVS says:

      07:39am | 22/03/12

      Since when did normal people start seriously paying attention to a youg punk’s twitter comments?

      He did it for attention - and gasp - he got it! Success.

    • marley says:

      08:09am | 22/03/12

      @Nathan - apparently, most of what he said is too scurrilous to be printed for our delicate eyes.  He has, however, been convicted of a criminal offence in relation to all of this, so a judge has already made the decision for you.

    • marley says:

      08:39am | 22/03/12

      @VVS - well, apparently police all over the country got complaints about the twitter comment, so I guess some normal people do pay attention.

    • S.L says:

      08:51am | 22/03/12

      @SteveKAG yes I agree this nobody reminds me of Big Brother contestants or should I say reality TV in general. Wanabe’s after their 15 minutes of fame…......

    • TJ says:

      10:01am | 22/03/12

      “I think most people who do this are just after a reaction. Even many people on the Punch will say things just to get a rise.” SteveKAG

      That’s true! It seems the only reason you comment here.

    • Inky says:

      11:02am | 22/03/12

      @TJ

      Based on that comment alone, I have devised the following:

      Pot. Kettle. Black.

    • SteveKAG says:

      12:44pm | 22/03/12

      TJ you obviously read one line and not the rest of it or you chose to ignore it based on having a cheap shot, either way i think it may you i am referring to with the 15 minutes of fake name fame syndrome…....

    • TJ says:

      01:59pm | 22/03/12

      LOL! Do you think this is the first time I’ve been on the Punch?

      You are on here everyday sparking SYD vs MELB and NRL (or Rugby as you unintelligently call it) vs AFL debates thinking you’re hilarious. eg. “Rugby’s not footy” If anyone deserves a cheap shot, it’s you my friend. The only article you failed to take a cheap shot at the NRL in the last few weeks was the AFL racism scandal the other day. Suprise suprise!

      Feel free to take swipes at any comments I make but I can tell you that’s the most accurate comment I’ve ever made on The Punch.

    • SteveKAG says:

      07:56pm | 22/03/12

      Actually TJ i don’t mind most of what you say….....the Sydney v Melbourne thing i must admit is a bit of tongue in cheek silliness….....I am really sorry if you take offense at it, i will try to be a bit more sensitive to the feelings of the less fortunate in the future (except for acotrel).

    • Reality Girl says:

      05:59pm | 26/03/12

      SteveKAG

      i have read plenty from you on the punch that was tongue in cheek or aimed at just getting a rise

      people come here to comment seriously and sometimes they come here to lighten the commentary, each has its place, sometimes i enjoy the funny comments more than the twevle paragraph rants of the annoyingly paranoid

      comment on the article if you want but really, calling most of your fellow punch commentators delletants is not going to win you any awards either, maybe you should have read the article and heeded the advice a little more closely

    • Kerryn says:

      05:53am | 22/03/12

      Sometimes I wonder if “free speech” is simply seen as a licence to be a complete arsehole and feel good about it.  “Yeah, I can say nasty things about you and because I have free speech you’re not allowed to be upset about it so nah nah nah nah!”.

      Some people are just immature and need to be sent back to kindy.  The kids can teach them some manners!

    • Al says:

      10:55am | 22/03/12

      Actualy ‘Free Speech’ does mean you can say what you like, but that doesn’t mean people can’t get upset about it.
      You also need to be able to back it up or be subject to defamation or discrimination laws.
      Inciting hatred laws however are rather vague as to what can and can’t be said and what falls under racial villification is also very vague and inconsistently applied.
      People have the right to express themselves, but others also have the right to condemn what they say.
      Nothing gives someone the right (or requirement) to not be offended.

    • im says:

      05:58am | 22/03/12

      The brits and you jason are so PC, you all need to chill out. Words from a stranger that you probably will never read or pay any attetion to.

    • fml says:

      07:14am | 22/03/12

      Rubbish, This is not about being PC. A man was dying in the field from cardiac arrest and someone pastes racially and sexually offensive terms about him and others. He is only 27 years old, thankfully he is recovering.

      These words incite racial hatred and in the UK it is illegal.

    • Ben says:

      08:03am | 22/03/12

      Interesting alternative view on PC from British comedian Stuart Lee - as quoted here: http://en.wikiquote.org/wiki/Stewart_Lee#On_political_correctness

      Not that I necessarily agree with him 100% - however, I’d be wary of throwing around “that’s so PC”.

      As for it being illegal in the UK - having lived here for a few years now so many stupid things are illegal that it is a ridiculous nanny state in a lot of ways.  They need to protect people (in particular children) from any possible risk in any way whatsoever - ban anything that might cause offence and encourage people to take offence at the smallest possible thing I think is actually counter-productive in calming things down.  And it is definitely not a great way to build up a bit of resilience in life really.

      While I understand there may be a line in the sand for some people - I also think there is a big difference between targeting and offending a singular individual for that purpose (something we should try to prevent) versus throwing out generic statements in the hope of getting a reaction (something that anyone with an ounce of willpower should be able to ignore).

    • im says:

      02:28pm | 22/03/12

      you would do very well in the UK “fml” but their are no blogs like this in the UK some of the comments and even the articles would be deemed offensive and even racist. The place is off the PC scale children as young as 4 have been interview by the police for racist comments at kindergarten. And big deal about the comments the welsh guy made people here or the USA wouldnt have wasted their time and given the dick head the notoriety.

    • fml says:

      02:38pm | 22/03/12

      im,

      I love the UK, well i agree with you when you say people here in australia wouldn’t care if a black man was racially abused, but i dare say the american’s would think it is abhorrent.

    • Greg says:

      05:57pm | 22/03/12

      fml, you are completely wrong.

      The facts are that a man was not dying (and he has not not died) and Stacey did not post racially and sexually offensive terms about Muamba.

      You have just fallen for propaganda intended to incite the feeble minded.

      Read all the media articles you like. Read them carefully this time. See what they really say, and you will find the truth.

    • Steve says:

      07:38pm | 22/03/12

      Greg, actually Fabrice Muamba has not “not not died” but that fact is not (not not) the issue.

    • Craig says:

      07:09am | 22/03/12

      Attention seeking behaviour is not new. I think the bully on the Simpsons (Nellson) sums up the conduct of these type of people online perfectly with his inappropriate “Ha ha” at someone’s misfortune.

    • M says:

      07:46am | 22/03/12

      Someone said something nasty on the interwebz?

      MORAL OUTRAGE!

    • marley says:

      08:30am | 22/03/12

      Ahh, not, not moral outrage.  Criminal offence.

    • M says:

      08:46am | 22/03/12

      Victimless crime.

    • Inky says:

      11:05am | 22/03/12

      @M

      Well, except for the guy dying on the pitch. But then, he’s not a *real* victim, is he?

    • M says:

      12:22pm | 22/03/12

      Who was victimized by a teenagers comment on twitter?

    • marley says:

      04:14pm | 22/03/12

      Stan Colleymore was pretty upset.  And he’d just had to deal with another moron of the same type sending him racist messages. 

      http://www.mirror.co.uk/news/uk-news/stan-collymore-praises-police-as-racist-768489

      But, you’re right, he didn’t get hurt, so I guess there was no victim.  You know what, though, when I think about it, I do have a certain feeling of moral outrage.  I wonder why you don’t.

    • M says:

      04:23pm | 22/03/12

      Because you let the little things get to you

    • marley says:

      06:47pm | 22/03/12

      @M - you’re right. Bigotry and racism are just little things, and I shouldn’t let them get to me.  So, tell me, what should I let get to me?  You seem to hyperventilate about speeding fines;  I think I’ll stick to worrying about university students in this day and age throwing racist comments around as though they meant nothing.

    • Greg says:

      08:46pm | 22/03/12

      marley, seeing as you want to “stick to worrying about university students in this day and age throwing racist comments around as though they meant nothing”, here is another example that you might want to concern yourself with:

      http://upressonline.com/2012/03/fau-student-threatens-to-kill-professor-and-classmates/

      This example actually contained a physical assault, as well as multiple racist death threats, and it was all recorded on video.

      Somehow, I suspect that it won’t get much attention in the media.

      I wonder why?

    • marley says:

      09:25pm | 22/03/12

      @Greg - I see you entirely missed the point of my exchange with M.

    • Deano says:

      07:47am | 22/03/12

      I call them Keyboard Ninjas.There are a few on here actually.

    • subotic says:

      03:09pm | 22/03/12

      Donny: Are these the Nazis, Walter?
      Walter Sobchak: No, Donny, these men are nihilists. There’s nothing to be afraid of.

    • S says:

      07:55am | 22/03/12

      Just because he shouldn’t have said it, doesn’t mean he should be prosecuted for it.

    • Edward T. Head says:

      09:22am | 22/03/12

      Of it does, the laws are there for a reason.

      We live in a society were inciting race hate is illegal, he deserves everything he gets.

    • S says:

      10:44am | 22/03/12

      Making a racist comment is completely different from ‘inciting race hate.’ From the sounds of it, everyone condemned him and the only hatred that was incited from his comments was hatred for him…

      The article says that he is somehow different from comedians because he isn’t “edgy” or “brave” or “wickedly controversial.” Why does this guy ‘deserve everything he gets’ but a comedian is allowed to be professionally racist? Particlarly when the comedian has a much bigger platform which makes it more likely to actually ‘incite race hate’...

      You are right that the laws are there for a reason. The reason is to stop hate groups like the KKK from openly and publicly preaching their hate; not to stop some guy from making an offensive, throw-away post on Twitter.

      Sticks and stones may break my bones, but words will never hurt me?

    • Edward T. Head says:

      11:06am | 22/03/12

      The point is he didn’t leave it at one comment.

      It would be impossible to chase down every offensive/illegal comment posted on the net by people smart enough to know how to use the voice the net gives them but not smart enough to know how to use it like an adult.

      He could have apologised or even remained silent. He didn’t do either.
      He chose to post more offensive comments assuming like most keyboard heroes that he is safe. He was wrong, he continued to break the law, he deserves everything he gets.

    • ScottB says:

      03:02pm | 22/03/12

      @ Edward T Head - “We live in a society were inciting race hate is illegal”  So that would make what J Gillard’s office staff did on Australia Day illegal then. Good that we have cleared that up, now, when are the charges going to be laid?

    • Edward T. Head says:

      04:25pm | 22/03/12

      ScottB - that’s a silly comment on so many different levels I’m not going to bother.

    • Greg says:

      06:09pm | 22/03/12

      Em T. Head, you can’t answer ScottB, can you?

      So you just pretend that you don’t want to. It’s transparent.

      But ScottB’s comment highlights the truth about these racial vilification laws - they are Orwellian thought crimes that are only selectively enforced for political purposes.

      Andrew Bolt gets prosecuted for noticing that many claimants for Aboriginal race-based benefits and awards all seem to have a very large amount of non-Aboriginal ancestry as well.

      There was no violence or riots following the publication of his truthful article, but he gets taken to court anyway, charged with racial vilification.

      Yet when somebody really does incite an actual race riot by telling outright lies, nothing happens.

      I suppose you “can’t be bothered” explaining this either, can you?

    • Edward T. Head says:

      09:47pm | 22/03/12

      No Greg I can answer Scott but it’s so obvious I’m surprised that there’s more than one person I need to dumb it down for.

      Scott’s post is silly because:
      1. The obsessive compulsion some have to segue every topic into an anti-government rant is tedious. We could have been talking about teletubbies and some bright spark like Scott would chip in with “Gillard looks like one” and then ride off into the sunset as if he’d made some sort of cogent, witty and winning argument.

      2. Ok lets accept Scotts poor segue, “Gillard’s office” did not officially do anything, one member of her staff tipped off the tent embassy. He did it off his own back and he lost his job over it. If you can prove otherwise then have at it, I’m sure someone like Laurie Oaks or here at the punch would love to publish the proof. And I’m not interested in conspiracy theories – and I’m not interested in a Labor dirty tricks rant because they all do it.

      3. The tip off to the tent embassy was not a “hey here’s where you can get whitey” type racist comment and it’s ridiculous to suggest it was an incitement to “race hate” or compare it to posting continual racially offensive comments on Twitter. It was merely a low attempt to embarrass the opposition leader. The people from the tent embassy were not protesting Abbott because of his colour but because of comments suggesting the tent embassy was no longer needed.

      Right now as to why your post is silly:
      1. “But ScottB’s comment highlights the truth about these racial vilification laws - they are Orwellian thought crimes that are only selectively enforced for political purposes.”

      No Scott’s comment highlights silliness as I’ve already pointed out, yours highlights paranoia. Look if you want to be racist that’s your business but if you want to racially abuse someone in public then we live in an enlightened society and have laws – you can’t belittle someone because of their race. This is just a matter of common decency and common sense for most people.

      2. “Andrew Bolt gets prosecuted for noticing that many claimants for Aboriginal race-based benefits and awards all seem to have a very large amount of non-Aboriginal ancestry as well.
      There was no violence or riots following the publication of his truthful article, but he gets taken to court anyway, charged with racial vilification.”


      You don’t deal in facts, so I’m really not sure why I’m bothering but how about you read the judgement. Bolt claimed that people who were born into and grew up in Aboriginal families with all the disadvantage that entails for many people of aboriginal heritage, people with dark skinned parents and siblings, that these people where not aboriginal because apparently he likes his darkies dark. Not only did he claim that these people where not aboriginal because they had light skin but that they’d got to where they were in life purely on the back of using their Aboriginality for handouts. Despite the fact that many had never received the hands outs he’d accused them off receiving. Bolt was wrong and so are you.

      3. “Yet when somebody really does incite an actual race riot by telling outright lies, nothing happens.
      I suppose you “can’t be bothered” explaining this either, can you?

      A riot? I suppose someone as deluded as you would call some banging on windows and pushing and shoving a riot. I wonder what you made of the Cronulla Riots you know a real, racially motivated riot and Alan Jones’ contribution to that, I’m guessing not much.

    • subotic J. Simpson says:

      08:10am | 22/03/12

      Our differences are only skin deep, but our sames go down to the bone.

    • Greg says:

      06:11pm | 22/03/12

      No, our differences go all the way down to our DNA.

    • Arnold Layne says:

      08:39am | 22/03/12

      Perhaps if it was just the intial comment he might have gotten away with an apology.  The follow up tweets in reply to those complaining demonstrated a level of deliberateness about it that demanded action of some description.  There is a big difference between freedom of speech and racial villification.

    • fml says:

      08:52am | 22/03/12

      Exactly,

      All we seem to hear on the punch is racism doesn’t exist. Here is a classic example, one thinks if it were directed at a white australian there would be much more moral outrage and much less rationalisation

      It’s the same everywhere, White person gets insulted -> there must be action,

      White person is the perpetrator -> not racist, misunderstand, where is the context, oh he is just joking around, he is a good bloke.

      Recent Examples are still fresh in our memories.

    • wingnut says:

      12:02pm | 22/03/12

      FML- Really when does that ever happen? It’s quite the opposite if anything.

      From my experience it’s not racist if you vilifying a white person.

    • SimonFromLakemba says:

      02:54pm | 22/03/12

      @Wingnut

      An Aussie guy in the UK is suing his workmates for racial discrimination.

      It does happen, just have to get over the guilt complex first.

    • Greg says:

      06:20pm | 22/03/12

      fml, your “classic example” is actually a white man who posted an insensitive but non-racial comment about a black man.

      Then the politically correct competitors in the quest for victimhood get upset, assume that he is a racist, and send racist comments back to him. So he then replies in kind.

      The people who initiated the racist insults are not taken to court, only the initial target of racist insults is.

      The fact is that if a white person insults a non-white person, then people like you just assume that the insult is motivated by racism.

      When the reverse happens, like with Yumi Stynes and Cpl Ben Roberts-Smith, then racism doesn’t get a single mention.

      Is this recent example still in your memory, or has it been put down your Orwellian memory hole?

      And how do you reconcile your bizzare theories with the truth?

    • Levi of QLD says:

      08:50am | 22/03/12

      storm in a teacup. Seriously people get over it

    • Pete says:

      09:12am | 22/03/12

      Twitter is for twits. What do you expect enlightened comment!

    • Edward T. Head says:

      09:43am | 22/03/12

      Twitter like Facebook is a tool and like most tools they can be used well or used poorly. I’ll never forget the amusing image of my Granddad cussing and blinding while struggling to remove a screw with a claw hammer while a selection of screwdrivers stuck out of his back pocket.

      I use twitter as a news feed, it’s quite useful.

    • Cynicised says:

      09:18am | 22/03/12

      Back in top form,TinMan. Excellent piece, gotta love the uppercut to insensitive idiots who use tragedy to sound “kewl”. As I said yesterday, we humans  are a  cruel species but one would hope that the better  angels of our nature would overcome the stupidity gene when a man is seriously ill in front of thousands. 

      Free speech may be something we aspire to as a laudable goal, to think that we can all express ourselves as we see fit ie “I don’t like what you say but I will defend to the death your right to say it”  but the problem is that humanity in general  isn’t fit for such freedom.  Far too often we exercise the noblest of liberties only to showcase the basest of our instincts. I’m no misanthropist, I love humanity in all our perversity and diversity, but sometimes I despair of our lack of collective compassion.

    • Seth Brundle says:

      10:02am | 22/03/12

      Yes, anything than anyone may say that could possibly offend someone should be silenced.

    • Cynicised says:

      10:16am | 22/03/12

      No, people should have the grace to censor themselves in the face of another’s pain and distress, but often they don’t, so someone,  the Law, has to say STOP!

    • fml says:

      10:20am | 22/03/12

      Not everything, Just things which incite hatred and disrupt the status quo of a civilised society. What this person said has not promoted debate, it has not advanced a cause, its only purpose was to incite hatred.

    • Edward T. Head says:

      10:24am | 22/03/12

      Lucky for you we can’t silence stupidity. However racial vilification is a crime.

    • Greg says:

      05:51pm | 22/03/12

      fml, you incite hatred by regularly writing stupid comments on The Punch, so maybe you should be made illegal.

      As for “disrupting the status quo of a civilised society”, that is just ridiculous. Where is the disruption? Who life has been irrepably damaged by an insensitive twitter post?

      As for promoting debate, what do you think these comments are?

    • Zopo says:

      10:29am | 22/03/12

      There used to be a time when people just had respect for other people.

      Anonymity has given people confidence to act like a complete goose, put a name and address to it and Im sure you will see a different world.

      Its funny how online people aren’t shy to express their feelings but when it’s face to face its a different story.

    • Greg says:

      05:40pm | 22/03/12

      The truth of this story is that Stacey put out a non-racial but very insensitive comment out on twitter while he was drunk.

      He received a lot of abuse back in response, which was fair enough. Some of the responses accused him of being racist, and abused him in racist terms. So he then posted racist insults back at his abusers.

      The truth is that Stacey did not racially abuse Muamba at all. He racially abused other people who had racially abused him first. But, being the white man, Stacey is the only one who is being charged with a crime.

      Read all of the stories written by politically correct journalists carefully, and see how they write around the truth to give a misleading impression. It’s what they do. All of them, not just in the UK, but here too.

    • Greg says:

      05:42pm | 22/03/12

      The truth of this story is that Stacey put out a non-racial but very insensitive comment out on twitter while he was drunk.

      He received a lot of abuse back in response, which was fair enough. Some of the responses accused him of being racist, and abused him in racist terms. So he then posted racist insults back at his abusers.

      The truth is that Stacey did not racially abuse Muamba at all. He racially abused other people who had racially abused him first. But, being the white man, Stacey is the only one who is being charged with a crime.

      Read all of the stories written by politically correct journalists carefully, and see how they write around the truth to give a misleading impression. It’s what they do. All of them, not just in the UK, but here too.

    • Marco says:

      11:36pm | 22/03/12

      Thanks for the info, Greg. I just looked up the screenshots and you’re actually right. And I take back my previous comments about Stacey.

      Seems the racism that began all of this was actually anti-white racism.

    • Edward T. Head says:

      08:03am | 23/03/12

      Yes he posted an insensitive comment and when people complained he abused them and Muamba racially. Not only that but he continued it for hours. He wasn’t defending himself or his right to free speech he was trolling for attention with racially abusive comments.

      Did he get racially abused as well? Probably but he chose to continue to incite with his racists comments. Of course typical of a bigot and those that support them who will pretend that two wrongs make a right. And of course like most bigots when caught out the weak excuses start, “I was drunk” - which isn’t an acceptable excuse in any court but apparently is in the mind of the bigot, “my phone was hacked, these aren’t my views” - but they were you views while you thought you where safe to attack people.

      This bloke knew he’d gone too far, you can see that from his last few tweets where he was saying how much he wished Muamba well and a speedy recovery this after hours of racist abuse.

      He’s a bigot and a dumb one, he deserves everything he gets. The only one misrepresenting the truth here is you Greg.

    • marley says:

      09:43am | 24/03/12

      Actually, this is really quite simple.  Stacey did commit racial vilification.  How do I know?  There is now a court decision showing that he did.  He admitted to it before a court of law.  Whether others might also have committed racial vilification is immaterial to whether or not he did.  And he did.  Case closed, your Honour.

    • Kharcha says:

      05:50pm | 19/04/12

      This commercial looks like it was made as a Community Service Project after they lost some kind of legal case.Did you ncotied the limp handshake between the “White” woman and the African American Male.The Red House must have been selling defective products to African Americans, or charging high interest rates to Minorities and that’s why they say all the products are the same whether you are Back or Whyte.

    • santa says:

      04:55pm | 06/06/12

      Racism is generally understood as either belief that different racial groups are characterized by intrinsic characteristics or abilities and that some such groups are therefore naturally superior to others. Thanks.
      Regards,
      fast diet

    • thesis proposal says:

      04:27pm | 07/06/12

      Some definitions would have it that any assumption that a person’s behavior would be influenced by their racial categorization is racist, regardless of how seemingly benign such assumptions might be. Other definitions would only include conscious malignant forms of discrimination. Thanks.
      Regards,

    • santa says:

      01:38pm | 08/06/12

      Racism and racial discrimination are often used to describe discrimination on an ethnic or cultural basis, independent of whether these differences are described as racial. According to the United Nations conventions, there is no distinction between the terms racial discrimination and ethnicity discrimination. Thanks.
      Regards,
      Thesis writing service

 

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From: Hasbro, go straight to gaol, do not pass go

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They should update other things in the game too. Instead of a get out of jail free card, they should have a Dodgy Lawyer card that not only gets you out of jail straight away but also gives you a fat payout in compensation for daring to arrest you in the first place. Instead of getting a hotel when you… [read more]

From: A guide to summer festivals especially if you wouldn’t go

Kel says:

If you want a festival for older people or for families alike, get amongst the respectable punters at Bluesfest. A truly amazing festival experience to be had of ALL AGES. And all the young "festivalgoers" usually write themselves off on the first night, only to never hear from them again the rest of… [read more]

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