Over the years there have been plenty of “tell-all” interviews by disgraced public figures which haven’t actually told us anything, other than confirm the desperation of the subject to clear their names or at least salvage their battered reputations by blaming everybody else.

Most of the pieces bagging this bloke could have been done ahead of his interview. Photo: AP

Think Alan Bond, after setting a record for his dissembling “can’t recall” efforts in court, trying to exculpate himself for leaving thousands of shareholders destitute. Tiger Woods trying to apologise for having sex with almost half the planet in a bid to win back his sponsors and get back on the clubs. Even last year’s stage-managed nonsense by the gold-medallist and piano-tosser Grant Hackett, conveniently hosted by Channel Nine ahead of his appearance as a special commentator on that network at the London Games.

I had little enthusiasm ahead of Lance Armstrong’s interview on Friday, for a couple of reasons. The first was that so much of it had been leaked in advance that it became a weird story where you felt like you were over it before it had even began. The second was that given he had spent almost two decades lying through his teeth, I doubted there was anything he could say which would be illuminating or even interesting.

I had my keyboard at the ready in the belief that the whole thing would be an exercise in blame-shifting, that he would present himself as a naïve and innocent victim of a crooked culture, that the sport made him do it. I also thought he would get a bit of an armchair ride from his mate Oprah, whose style of interviewing tends to go more for soft confessional than sleeves-up interrogation.
 
Not only was it a robust and thorough interview, it was a fascinating one. It was fascinating mainly because Armstrong, who has always been a man who exuded self-confidence, arrogance and ego, was stripped back to the very essence of his being and resigned to the fact that he had to be absolutely honest about everything he had ever done.

It was not like he had any choice. As he said at the start of the interview, “this is too late, probably too late for most people”. He looked totally defeated, totally ashamed. There was no way he could have credibly got away with putting his behaviour in some artificial context, blaming others for placing him under pressure, saying that he succumbed to a broader culture, even though that broader culture most certainly did exist, if it doesn’t still exist in this absurdly discredited sport.

But it should be recognised that he was completely honest. It is here where he differs with many who have been busted and used their first interview to try to slither their way out of strife.

Despite his candour Armstrong should not be rehabilitated as some kind of hero for telling the truth in such a ludicrously belated fashion. He surrendered that right by being such a defiant and pig-headed and aggressive person for so long, calling people liars for correctly suggesting he was on the juice, threatening legal action against his detractors and plotting to ostracise clean cyclists who wanted to abide by the rules. He admitted as much on Friday. He should instead be remembered as a case study in the dangers of blind hero worship. It is hard to imagine how many people did their dough on his books, wasted their time and money flying to Adelaide to see him ride, joined the twitter throng when he tweeted that he was going for a ride along the beach in SA. If it wasn’t based on deceit it would be sort of amusing that so many grown men squeezed themselves into lycra in a bid to emulate their hero.

The people I feel really sorry for are the many victims of cancer who drew inspiration from his absurd story. Whether Armstrong was a drug cheat or not, I always regarded him as a scientifically-challenged macho man for constructing such a hairy-chested mythology around his cancer battle. He seemed to have got it into his head that he was such a super hero that he just stared the cancer down. It’s rubbish. Cancer is a crap shoot. You either die or you don’t. I have friends who have survived this capricious and horrible condition, and others who have died from it. The ones who carked it didn’t do so because they weren’t mentally strong or not up for the fight. It’s rubbish to suggest as much, as Armstrong did through his actions, turning it into one of the central planks of his entire marketing strategy. But as he said on Friday, “the story was so perfect for so long” – overcoming disease, winning seven Tours, the perfect marriage, great kids. Except, you know, it was all based on crap.

Finally, and out of journalistic self-interest, the Armstrong story is an excellent testament to the deeply irritating role of reporters as world’s best practice pains in the backside. I sincerely hoped that the French hacks at L’Equipe, who were defamed by Armstrong as envious, evil liars for the best part of a decade, cracked a few bottles of their quality local drop on Friday night. Without their perseverance this story may have never been told, and this sport never been given a chance to clean itself up, if indeed it can. Indeed the only way the sport can probably get its house in order is if people keep on hating Lance Armstrong.

The most dangerous suggestion for cycling in Armstrong’s comments was that what he did was not the exception but the norm. Obviously that was the case. If everyone believes that, there is little point regarding it as a sport at all, more a drug-taking competition. 

Most commented

43 comments

Show oldest | newest first

    • DJ says:

      07:51am | 20/01/13

      but he wasn’t completely honest, didn’t even go as far as Tyler Hamilton’s book. It was a minimalist interview at best and deflected all the tough questions around ferrari, the UCI, the perjury in the hospital. He admitted this is about getting back into competition and showed no real remorse just resignation.

    • pete says:

      09:07am | 20/01/13

      Why does he have to respond to a parasite like Hamilton? Hamilton benefited all those years from being in Armstrong’s presence, did the same deeds and banked some good dollars and then when the money dries up and the career is over, he realises he’s still got one chip in the game, Armstrong, and keeps cashing in on it.

      Hamilton is an equally big weasel as Armstrong.

    • stephen says:

      09:23am | 20/01/13

      Tyler Hamilton spilt the beans on his mate because he wanted to make some money on his book, and he needed a reason for people to read it ... not to mention that his wife had to twist his ear to get him to talk to someone, (she must have wanted a new car.)

      Floyd Landis blabbed because he was refused a place in the US Postal team with Lance.

      I’d like to see both these two in front of Oprah, welling up, snivelling, asking for forgiveness, because they have, of course, exercized their right to free speech, but certainly, I wouldn’t trust them to clean out the stables.
      (Horseshit smells better, and I would get my mounts to read a bit of playboy before they got in there.)

    • Rose says:

      01:07pm | 20/01/13

      Maybe Landis and Hamilton did what they did in order to undo some of the damage caused, and because while Armstrong was the control centre of the doping programme, it was not him who was paying the price. The other simple fact remains that, if they wanted to come clean about their own drug use, it was pointless and impossible to do it without implicating Armstrong and the others who were pulling the strings.
      Landis and Hamilton are no heroes, but their sins are not as great as Armstrong’s and they deserve to be congratulated for speaking out, not condemned.

    • NESLIHAN KUROSAWA says:

      08:25am | 20/01/13

      Hi David,

      The very people we look up to as role models happen to be less than perfect! And those very people like Lance Armstrong seem to want it all, power, fame and money just to mention a few! Most of the time some of those role models will do anything to get up there with the best of the best so that they can impress everyone with their performance with a little help from performance enhancing drugs. A little disappointed? Maybe so but surely they aren’t committing any major crimes. Just like you mentioned the famous names in the sporting arena have a lot to answer for only when and if they are caught out! 

      However having a chance to tell his version of reality twice with Oprah Winfrey hasn’t been such a bad experience after all.  Because as the members of the public are interested in the little details of his major down falls, it creates a special kind of target audience trying to make excuses for all the wrong decisions of the past.  Will that change anything major when it comes to the public perception of what we consider to be honest and decent?  That all depends on how forgiving and kind we are all prepared to be towards such incidences in the first place. 

      My favorite expression of all time happens to be that “today’s headlines in the news papers will be nothing more than yesterday news”.  Mr Lance Armstrong has said that being forced to retire from his well respected position can almost mean the end of his life. Well I have heard much worse punishments in my life. And in my personal opinion I wonder if all the so called misfortunes have made him a better man, may be?  On this occasion we will leave out the role model part because he has just proved that he has been hiding behind so many lies.  Kind regards.

    • damien says:

      08:27am | 20/01/13

      Were we watching the same interview? He refused to name names, he told half truths like his doping program was ‘conservative’ and showed zero contrition. The only regret he seemed to have was that he made a comeback in 2009, as he reckons he wouldn’t have been found out had it not been for this. It was a shameful puff piece of PR.

    • damien says:

      08:27am | 20/01/13

      Were we watching the same interview? He refused to name names, he told half truths like his doping program was ‘conservative’ and showed zero contrition. The only regret he seemed to have was that he made a comeback in 2009, as he reckons he wouldn’t have been found out had it not been for this. It was a shameful puff piece of PR.

    • marley says:

      08:36am | 20/01/13

      “But it should be recognised that he was completely honest.”

      Really?  He said he didn’t dope on his comeback in 2009;  WADA begs to differ.  And he certainly tanked on the question about whether he lied under oath in that court case back in 2005.  Frankly, I think the whole thing was carefully orchestrated to tiptoe around as many legal minefields as possible without revealing anything more than had become public record with the USADA report.

      I think Lance thought his public display of contrition would be sufficient to rehabilitate his reputation;  I think he badly misjudged both the public attitude and his own acting ability.

    • Kelly Exeter says:

      09:16am | 20/01/13

      As others have said - the major problem with this interview was that he WASN’T completely honest. And in some instances lied outright - in others, was simply evasive.

      So for mine - the interview was actually completely pointless but for the fact that there were actually still some die-hards clinging to the thought that he was simply the victim of a giant witch hunt and he finally set them straight.

    • Lucy Blundell says:

      09:16am | 20/01/13

      When is Oprah interviewing Gillard?

    • Honest Liar says:

      11:48am | 20/01/13

      When I saw the article title and the picture of someone on a bike I first thought it was Abbott.

      Don’t be too hard on them. It’s just that sometimes, in the heat of the moment, you go a bit further.

    • Glz says:

      03:43pm | 20/01/13

      @honest liar,
      Don’t be too hard on them. It’s just that sometimes, in the heat of the moment, you go a bit further.

      Like when Gillard said “there will be no carbon tax”  we really should have had her write it down.

    • Bill of Queensland says:

      09:26am | 20/01/13

      One could not have expected this to be anything more than a carefully staged well-filtered performance for the benefit of Lance Armstrong!

    • Wayne Kerr says:

      09:28am | 20/01/13

      “Despite his candour Armstrong should not be rehabilitated as some kind of hero for telling the truth in such a ludicrously belated fashion”

      However this is exactly what Armstrong and his PR entourage were aiming for.  The interview was damage control, pure and simple.

    • Robert S McCormick says:

      09:29am | 20/01/13

      Sorry, David,
      I usually agree with most of what you say but this time I beg to differ.
      Armstrong came across to me as just Lance being Lance, Cold, Calculating with an eye on the main chance. he portrayed himself as “The Victim”. It was all about how HE felt about his deserved Life-time ban & how unfair that was.
      How HE felt about having to leave the Charity he set up.
      Armstrong is Finished when it comes to any Sport or Business.
      Even if he manages to have the Sporting ban reduced to 10 years, by which time he would be 51 & probably only eligible for those so-called “Master’s Series” he would find no-one would take part in any competition or even Exhibition event in which he wanted to compete.
      OK, he set up that Charity using money he obtained from his cheating. He had his name on it but the actual work was done by others.
      Not a word from him about how this has impacted on the people who actually did the hard work or, & this is important, future funding for the charity.
      It was all, & always was, about how he felt, how it had impacted on him.
      Not a word from him about how his cheating has impacted on all those 1000s of young people to whom he presented himself to as “Mr Clean of ALL Sports”
      Children, with the help of their parents, knew about his fight with Testicular Cancer.
      These questions must now be asked:
      Was it true, as has been so often claimed, that his Testicular Cancer had, in fact, metastesised into his lungs & brain?
      Or was this just a part of the entire con-job?
      As most people know, Testicular Cancer, if caught early enough as a result of regular, even daily, self-examination is eminently cureable. We were not told that Armstrong had had a particularly aggressive form of it so that the secondaries appeared in his lungs & brain very shortly after the initial diagnosis.
      Let no-one try to tell us that this Elite Sportsman was, unlike all the others, not under very strict medical supervision etc. for they, their managers & medicos have a lot riding on them being 100% fit.
      Not a word about the people he dishonestly sued &, collectively, ripped millions off, almost , or did, destroy their careers & reputations.
      The entire alleged interview, actually it was more like a cosy little chat between two close friends, was designed for two reasons only:
      (1) To get Winfrey’s Show off to a good start, ratings & make lots of money.
      (2) To get her mate, Armstrong, off the hook, to turn him into some sort of “Poor Hard done by Victim” & get him some sympathy.
      It all simply does not wash.

    • Gregg says:

      09:30am | 20/01/13

      Great article David and though I’ve not tuned in to the whole interviews but just caught some parts, a few telling comments for me are associated with your last paragraph.
      ” The most dangerous suggestion for cycling in Armstrong’s comments was that what he did was not the exception but the norm. Obviously that was the case. If everyone believes that, there is little point regarding it as a sport at all, more a drug-taking competition. “
      And more so than dangerous, I found it somewhat bemusing that Lance is either extremely stupid or at the very least very naive when he made a reference to being surprised at the anger being displayed by some people.
      Like it is not as though there has not been extreme attempts in fighting drugs in sport and not just cycling for a couple of decades now, there having been the East Germans in Olympics and then with Le Tour, there was one year I recall where riding was abandoned on one particular day and can’t remember but that might have even been instigated by some riders,

      Maybe Lance has stepped a bit too far in assuming what he did was the norm for whilst it may have been the norm for even more than a few, should we not also have hope that there are those who compete without the use of drugs to assist.

      ” But it should be recognised that he was completely honest. It is here where he differs with many who have been busted and used their first interview to try to slither their way out of strife. “
      And yes, we should give him some credit for his honesty now, even if it is for various reasons very belated.

      I do not know that rehabilitation ought to be such a big issue and a life time ban on any competing is a bit tough for someone who would just like to try a marathon when fifty.
      Perhaps one of the worse aspects of his cheating has been
      ” plotting to ostracise clean cyclists who wanted to abide by the rules. “

      ” The people I feel really sorry for are the many victims of cancer who drew inspiration from his absurd story. Whether Armstrong was a drug cheat or not, I always regarded him as a scientifically-challenged macho man for constructing such a hairy-chested mythology around his cancer battle. He seemed to have got it into his head that he was such a super hero that he just started the cancer down. It’s rubbish. Cancer is a crap shoot. You either die or you don’t. I have friends who have survived this capricious and horrible condition, and others who have died from it. ”

      Whilst I can understand disappointment in this regard, if there are also many who have received inspiration from him, that can only possibly be for the better and certainly the Live Strong organisation has benefitted greatly and hopefully has also been able to pass on many benefits to many.

      “But as he said on Friday, “the story was so perfect for so long” – overcoming disease, winning seven Tours, the perfect marriage, great kids.”
      And yes the kids, not the many that may have seen him as some sort of idol but his very own and Lance mentioned his son Luke who was defending him at school until Lance told him not to do so any longer, possibly something of a catalyst for his coming out.
      Luke is likely devastated and defending his dad might have been something minor compared to what he goes through now and how he feels.
      Hopefully he will be OK for the longer term with it all.
      ” Indeed the only way the sport can probably get its house in order is if people keep on hating Lance Armstrong. “
      Hopefully there will not be too many haters about but that could likely be a vain hope.

      Maybe it would be a great result if there was an official and accepted course of drugs that were not harmful but did help with the stamina required and high altitude efforts, Cortizone for instant supposedly helps with recovery from injuries though it has not done me any good with crook shoulders.

      And then even in AFL, there are the chill vests that some clubs have introduced to help players cope better on extremely hot days and players having ice baths etc., so is there not a case for identifying what may help in the most extreme cycling competition and officially sanctioning some aids.

      At the end of the day, I suspect the assistance obtained from drugs could be relatively minor compared to the hours on hours of training and sheer efforts involved in hours of cycling in the grand tours and Lance still needs to be remembered well in many respects.

    • John Hay says:

      09:35am | 20/01/13

      Looks like you were sucked in David, good and proper. It was obvious Lance was saying, “Everyone does it. Drugs were just like air in tyres.” He even said he thought he was being punished more than he deserved to be. After listening to him I understand that in order to win in that race you have to do all those things he did. If you don’t, you lose. I saw no remorse; only more unbridled ambition. In my opinion he preceded most lies with words like, “It will be hard for people to believe this, but…”

    • Zack says:

      10:12am | 20/01/13

      Oh well Lance did bad. But seriously who are we to judge. I mean people out there get away with all kinds of nonsense (abandoning their family for another woman comes to mind), why are their actions not as bad as what Lance did? I’m no angel and would be the last person to join in this bashing.

    • Rose says:

      12:56pm | 20/01/13

      Simple. your example is merely the breakdown of one relationship to begin/continue another. It’s unpleasant and possibly even unfair (to the partner left behind), but it can actually be done in such a way that long term damage s minimal and both parties can look to a brighter future. The trouble comes about if the partner left behind can’t accept the relationship breakdown or either partner chooses to attack the other through either bad behaviour or by financially screwing the other or worse, using the kids as a weapon.
      In Armstrong’s case he benefited financially, to the tune of hundreds of millions of dollars, by defrauding pretty much the entire world. He bullied people, falsely suing some, ensuring others were denied opportunities they had earnt simply because they didn’t support his regime.
      If Armstrong wants redemption, let him pay back the money he screwed from others, let him stand up in a Court and in front of the cycling authorities and confess the ENTIRE truth, naming names and exposing how he did what he did for so long and who supported him to do so, and let him humbly accept whatever punishment, including gaol if appropriate.
      The man has not even begun to earn forgiveness, redemption or whatever it is he is seeking, he has merely taking a first, tentative step, with his hand being held the whole way by Oprah. I bet he even chose Oprah to cash in the the enormous power she has to determine public opinion, not because she was going to ensure the truth would be revealed.

    • John Hay says:

      01:43pm | 20/01/13

      Who are we to judge? Why, we are the people he lied his pants off too.

    • Zack says:

      04:26pm | 20/01/13

      Rose I guess by your statement it makes Gillard fair game. She betrayed, lied, will pocket a hefty pension with perks…............and she is more relevant than Lance to Australians.

    • Rose says:

      08:02pm | 20/01/13

      Well, if you’ve picked up a newspaper even once in the last few years Zack, you would be well aware that not only is Gillard fair game, she’s been copping her fair share. Some of the flak she gets is deserved, some isn’t!!

    • Harquebus says:

      10:17am | 20/01/13

      With war, famine and economic decay possibly on our doorsteps, this all that our “top” journalists can talk about. Good grief.
      We’ll see how important this story is in a couple of years time when, we are asking those same “top” journalists, “Where were ya?”.

    • NSS says:

      11:05am | 20/01/13

      Meh, over it already. What Armstrong did was very wrong, he’s a a borderline sociopath and a weasel, of this there is no doubt. However, he is not a mass murderer, so is not the devil incarnate. Multiple articles on his duplicity and subsequent self-serving confession feel unwarranted. One would have sufficed.

    • John Hay says:

      01:46pm | 20/01/13

      I’m sure if he had been balding and fat, with a big nose, you would be very unforgiving. He’s trim and James Bond like, so you forgive him. In my case I would not trust him as far as I could throw him. I would avoid him like the plague.

    • stephen says:

      03:19pm | 20/01/13

      You mean Bert Newton, then ?
      Hell, I forgave him years ago.

      The reason so many forgive Armstrong is because the Schleck brothers would have been winning all these tours, and I gotta say, they’s a boring as Pete Sampras.

    • NSS says:

      04:49pm | 20/01/13

      @John Hay. Au contraire. My partner is fat and balding and I forgive him constantly. Ha!

      PS. I wouldn’t trust LA either, however I can think of much worse than what he did.

    • marley says:

      06:33pm | 20/01/13

      @NSS - yeah, I can think of worse. I don’t know that many people though, who have managed to accrue a few hundred million out of lying.  Alan Bond, Bernie Madoff, Lance Armstrong.  He’s no murderer, and when you’ve said that, you’ve said everything in is favour

    • Jaqui says:

      11:12am | 20/01/13

      Oh common its cycling, the most drug riddled sport in the world. Hell have you seen how psycotic these people are on the road and the instant roid rage against pedestrians is an obvious indicator of drugs they live on.

    • stephen says:

      06:38pm | 20/01/13

      We don’t do drugs… except the legal ones like dopamine and serotonin.

      (Plus the pretty girls, down on the avenue.)

    • Bear says:

      11:16am | 20/01/13

      Why is Americans answer to everything rehab? How do you get rehab from being a bully, liar, cheat, egomaniac and arrogant jerk!?

    • pa_kelvin says:

      11:20am | 20/01/13

      Were we watching the same interview???

    • Luke says:

      11:31am | 20/01/13

      I think you wrote this piece from Planet Lance. The interview seemed different to people here on earth David.

    • Nikki says:

      12:25pm | 20/01/13

      The most amusing thing is he thinks he deserves to compete again. Deluded sociopath!

    • RBarker says:

      12:36pm | 20/01/13

      I find it difficult to understand why people get so personally and emotionally involved with those of celebrity status, to the point where they are devastated if they die (Diana) or prove to be total criminal sleaze-bags (Jimmy Savile) or bullying cheats (Lance Armstrong). I would be devastated if the person was my husband, children or a close friend but outside that small circle I have only a distant curiosity as to how these people live or die or conduct themselves. As a Tour de France tragic I decided years ago that Lance’s results were down to blood and chemicals and that if he was on it so must his team be as well; they were just too expert to be believable. By the time Lance was up to his 5th, 6th and 7th wins I stopped watching as the whole shebang became too boring, and if I’m down on Lance in any personal sense it would be for that as much as anything else. Using performance enhancers the way they did removed the thrill of watching a grueling edgy event that tests humans to their limit.
      Who cares what he said to Oprah? Or if he should participate in sport again? Maybe it would be good for his soul to find something else to do, apply to Bill Gates for a job perhaps.
      He’s yesterday’s news. In the meantime Cadel is having another shot and we know he’s an honest Aussie.

    • Philosopher says:

      01:31pm | 20/01/13

      David I think you went too soft on this problem for that is what it is.  This man Armstrong is a product of the US idea that anything is possible if it suits your political or economic purpose.  in 2008 the lying weasels of Wall Street wrecked the world economy on purpose and they are about to do it again from congress. The Chinese were quite open about the US advice to them re doping in sport.  The entire Peleton is suspect and Dick Pound has it probably right that they need a holiday from the Olympics to clean up their act.. History repeats itself and we have been here before.  It got so bad in ancient Greece that Alexander closed the Olympics down and only allowed those with military service to compete and it stayed closed for 2200 years. These people are the most organised and successful criminals seen in the world of sport and Armstrong is a ringleader.  They need to be removed from it permanently.

    • Rhonda from Brisbane says:

      01:51pm | 20/01/13

      At least there’s some sensible people out there, that’s always good to know.  While I don’t condone what Armstrong did, I’m also not a raving maniac about it either.  I wonder how many of you so called experts actually ride a bike. I’m totally blown away by how many people seem to be taking this personally.  What he did is not right but if we’re going to hate everyone who lies how about we get a bit of perspective. Lance lied but it doesn’t affect my day to day life, almost all politicians lie and that DOES affect my day to day life.  Lets get real here, he didn’t murder anyone, he’s not a paedophile, he’s not a rapist, for pete’s sake people, get a life and stop hanging off everything reporters write or say.  And as to not naming names, he’s abused because he didn’t, but you’d all abuse him if he did saying he was just trying to pass the buck. He really can’t win can he.  And I’m sorry but there are a lot more sports people, not just cyclists, who still take drugs, when are they going to be vilified like Armstrong.  And as to someones comment about all cyclists being on drugs because of how they react to SOME motorists stupidity, I take exception to that. If you had to deal with people trying to run you off the road, not once but several times each time you rode a bike, if you had to deal with idiots throwing full coke cans at you while going on a training ride, maybe you too would get a bit agro every now and then.  And would that mean that you’re on drugs too?  I know first hand how angry I used to get when my husband would come home from a training ride with skin off from being forced into a guard rail, or when he came home sticky from having a 1/2can of coke thrown at him, which by the way becomes a missile at the speeds cars are travelling, or how you talk to a mate who had a car door opened on him while out riding just because the motorist didn’t like cyclists and he was in hospital for months and off work for over a year.  Or better yet getting that call from your husband to say he’s being taken to hospital after being hit by a car and he’s one of the old school cyclists who does the right thing and respects everyones right to be one the road.  How many irate motorists have a child who rides to school or over to his mates.  Think about them next time you try to run a cyclist off the road because you don’t think he should be there. 
      And I’m sorry but how many of you who actually watch the Tour de France are going to be happy when the winning times are slower than last year or when riders can’t make it up the Alps.  Of course that’s not quite as exciting is it.  Once again I’m not saying banned substances should be allowed but this race expects riders to be superhuman just to complete half the race, but you armchair jockeys seem to think this is normal to expect someone to be able to climb those Alps day after day after day.  Get real people, if you need to get on your soapbox about something make it something worthwhile, like why we seem to be taxed on every little thing we do, like why after all these years of donations there are still starving children in Africa, like why children are still being stolen from their families and forced to fight under dictators. Really people, get a life

    • Ladyjane says:

      04:24pm | 20/01/13

      Yes, he’s not a paedophile or rapist, but he did destroy other people’s lives, just not in the same way. Or does destroying someone else’s career prospects or taking their money by suing them under false pretences not matter because there’s no blood or physical attack involved? There’s a lot more involved than ‘just’ lying or taking drugs. If that was all that was involved, I think many people would be far more forgiving. I also find it interesting that your post is considerably longer and far more emotional than the majority of those of the people you’re telling to get a life and stop being angry about Armstrong.

    • Holus Bolus says:

      02:02pm | 20/01/13

      Where Tiger Woods chose to stick his willy was never anyone’s business. The sticky-beaks were more at fault than he was. They should have butted the hell out and gotten a goddamned hobby. Too much frigging time on their stupid, ignorant hands.

    • stephen says:

      03:28pm | 20/01/13

      Tiger’s stick beak is none of your business either fella.

      ps and it’s ‘friggin’. Get it right, sunshine.

    • Rose says:

      04:25pm | 20/01/13

      Tiger Wood’s made it the public’s business when he created an entirely false image that allowed him to make millions of dollars out of a gullible public.

    • Matt says:

      02:04pm | 20/01/13

      Good point ‘RBarker’.. whether it’s an individual, sports team or celebrity, we have to realize that these people are not family or even friends and in reality, not even part of our lives. The problem is that we put people on a pedestal and are shocked when we find them ‘human’! That doesn’t change what the person has done nor make it right but it says everything about us that we’re somehow surprised these things happen. More concerning is that for some, it took that interview to believe what had happened! If your so emotionally attached to something that you cant or wont see something for what it is, there is a problem

    • Geronimo says:

      04:08pm | 20/01/13

      Dubya’s habitually lying Deputy Sheriff has awarded you the Ding Donger from his Texas Cow Bell for your very appreciative Sin of Omission.

 

Facebook Recommendations

Read all about it

Punch live

Up to the minute Twitter chatter

Recent posts

The latest and greatest

The Punch is moving house

The Punch is moving house

Good morning Punchers. After four years of excellent fun and great conversation, this is the final post…

Will Pope Francis have the vision to tackle this?

Will Pope Francis have the vision to tackle this?

I have had some close calls, one that involved what looked to me like an AK47 pointed my way, followed…

Advocating risk management is not “victim blaming”

Advocating risk management is not “victim blaming”

In a world in which there are still people who subscribe to the vile notion that certain victims of sexual…

Nosebleed Section

choice ringside rantings

From: Hasbro, go straight to gaol, do not pass go

Tim says:

They should update other things in the game too. Instead of a get out of jail free card, they should have a Dodgy Lawyer card that not only gets you out of jail straight away but also gives you a fat payout in compensation for daring to arrest you in the first place. Instead of getting a hotel when you… [read more]

From: A guide to summer festivals especially if you wouldn’t go

Kel says:

If you want a festival for older people or for families alike, get amongst the respectable punters at Bluesfest. A truly amazing festival experience to be had of ALL AGES. And all the young "festivalgoers" usually write themselves off on the first night, only to never hear from them again the rest of… [read more]

Gentle jabs to the ribs

Superman needs saving

Superman needs saving

Can somebody please save Superman? He seems to be going through a bit of a crisis. Eighteen months ago,… Read more

28 comments

Newsletter

Read all about it

Sign up to the free News.com.au newsletter